CURE Seminar Series: Social Enterprise: Examining the Quest to Humanize Business

Flyer for the May 5th CURE SeminarSocial enterprises are businesses that utilize their revenue to combat social problems. Since the millennium, social enterprises have significantly grown throughout the United States. This talk will focus on Doctoral Candidate Rasheda L. Weaver’s empirical research study of 115 social enterprises throughout the nation. The discussion will describe the social issues social enterprises target, how they generate revenue, the laws they incorporate under, and the contexts in which they develop.

Photo of Rasheda WeaverRasheda L. Weaver is a fourth-year PhD candidate in the Public Affairs program at Rutgers University-Camden that will graduate in May 2017. Her research interests include social entrepreneurship, community development, and applied psychology.

This event is FREE and open to the public. 
Lunch will be provided.

“Rio’s True Olympic Legacy: What have we learned? What next?” Nov 15

“Rio’s True Olympic Legacy: What have we learned? What next?”
Theresa Williamson
Executive Director, Catalytic Communities, Rio de Janeiro
Tuesday, November 15, 2016
4:30-6pm
Multi-Purpose Room Campus Center

Sponsored by the Department of Public Policy and Administration, CURE, Urban Studies Program, and the Dean’s Office of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences

riopicDozens of official legacy promises were made to Rio de Janeiro’s citizens that would come as a result of hosting August’s Olympic Games. In the end, what Rio experienced was a very public six year “boom and bust” resulting in deep skepticism and anger over the failed legacies of the Games. Now, two months after the Games, Brazil is living through a deep economic recession, and in Rio crime rates and unemployment are rising while resources dry up, the police are downsizing, and the international media are swooping off to cover the next beat. The Olympics, which invested some $15 billion in the city, feel like a distant memory. And the past week’s mayoral election also brings an entirely new political agenda to the table.

With all these changes taking place as we speak, and taking Rio’s favelas–the city’s most chronically underserved communities–as the focal point, Williamson’s talk presents a deep introduction to Rio and its social struggles, including the city’s racial history, through the lens of Olympic legacy. What do Rio’s Olympic legacy promises tell us about Rio? About the Olympic Games? What were the true impacts of the Games and is there a silver lining? That is, were there impacts the city wouldn’t promote as legacies, that are, in practice, the true legacies? How have communities learned to act and resist thanks to the Games? And in this context, what will happen next to Rio de Janeiro? Is there hope?

 

 

Next CURE seminar, October 21: “American Governor: Chris Christie’s Bridge To Redemption”

Photo of Matt KatzMatt Katz
Reporter
WNYC and NPR

Books available for purchase and author’s signature.

Friday, October 21, 2016 
12:15pm – 1:30pm
Faculty Lounge, 3rd Floor Armitage Hall

Lunch will be served
Free and open to the public

Matt will tell the inside political story about Chris Christie’s seven years as governor, from the Bridgegate scandal to his controversial role in Camden to his presidential candidacy.

Matt Katz is a political reporter for WNYC and NPR who covered New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie for more than five years, first for The Philadelphia Inquirer and then for WNYC and New Jersey Public Radio. He ran The Christie Tracker — which followed the governor through scandal and presidential candidacy — and appeared weekly on WNYC Studios’ Christie Tracker Podcast. In January 2016, Matt’s biography of Christie — American Governor: Chris Christie’s Bridge to Redemption — was published by Simon & Schuster’s Threshold Editions. Matt has written about politics for The Washington Post, The New York Times, The New Republic and POLITICO magazine.

In 2015 Matt and a team from WNYC won a Peabody Award for their coverage of Christie and the Bridgegate scandal. Prior to covering the Statehouse in Trenton he spent time in Afghanistan, writing a series on reconstruction efforts that won the Livingston Award for International Reporting. In 2009 his four-part investigation about Camden set the stage for an end to the state’s takeover of city government.

CURE seminars are free and open to the public.  No registration is required. 

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