CURE Seminar Series: Social Enterprise: Examining the Quest to Humanize Business

Flyer for the May 5th CURE SeminarSocial enterprises are businesses that utilize their revenue to combat social problems. Since the millennium, social enterprises have significantly grown throughout the United States. This talk will focus on Doctoral Candidate Rasheda L. Weaver’s empirical research study of 115 social enterprises throughout the nation. The discussion will describe the social issues social enterprises target, how they generate revenue, the laws they incorporate under, and the contexts in which they develop.

Photo of Rasheda WeaverRasheda L. Weaver is a fourth-year PhD candidate in the Public Affairs program at Rutgers University-Camden that will graduate in May 2017. Her research interests include social entrepreneurship, community development, and applied psychology.

This event is FREE and open to the public. 
Lunch will be provided.

Cure Seminar Series: Joshua D. Phillips Listening to the Voices of the Homeless in Public Policy Debates

Joshua Phillips CURE flyer imageA half-century after the “War on Poverty” of Lyndon Johnson, poverty rates remain unchanged. Scholars have advanced polarized theories about the causes of poverty, as politicians have debated how (or if) to fund welfare programs. Yet little research has been conducted where the poor are provided a platform to speak on their own behalf. While it is important to understand how economic systems affect the homeless, it is equally important to learn about the day-to-day realities faced by those who rely on public policies for survival. Over the course of 10 years, Dr. Phillips has worked with numerous homeless communities, including communities in Camden, NJ, central Michigan, and southern Illinois. Drawing on the author’s experience working in homeless communities, this research presents some of the stories of loss, abuse, addiction, and marginalization through interviews, observations, and ethnographic research.

Joshua D. Phillips, Ph.D., is an instructor in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Brandywine. His scholarly interests are in rhetoric, narrative, and intercultural communication with specific focus on issues of homelessness, poverty, welfare, race, and sexual violence. His new book, Homeless: Narratives from the Streets, recounts stories of homelessness in an effort to improve public policy.

In 2010, he published his first book 1,800 Miles: Striving to End Sexual Violence, One Step at a Time. His recent publications include “Trial by Social Media: How Misleading Media and Ideological Protests led to Disastrous Results in the State of Florida v. George Zimmerman,” “LeBron James as Cybercolonized Spectacle: A Critical Race Reading of Whiteness in Sport,”“Dancing as Voice: The Rize of Krumping and Clowning as Black Vernacular Rhetoric,” “Black Women and Gender Violence: Lil’ Wayne’s ‘How to Love’ as Progressive Hip Hop,” and “Crystal Mangum as Hypervisble Object and Invisible Subject: Black Feminist Thought, Sexual Violence, and the Pedagogical Repercussions of The Duke Lacrosse Rape Case.”

Visitor Parking
Parking in Rutgers–Camden lots is by permit only. Visitors to Rutgers–Camden should obtain a temporary permit to park in a lot from 8 a.m. Mondays through 5 p.m. Fridays. Contact Parking and Transportation for more information.

Parking and Transportation
(within the Rutgers University Police Department)
409 North Fourth Street
(856) 225-6137
Visit these sites for directions to campus and to view a campus map

Date & Time
April 14, 2017
12:15 pm-1:30 pm

Location
Armitage Hall
Faculty Lounge, 3rd Floor
311 N. Fifth St.
Camden, NJ

Cure Seminar Series: Sara Goldrick-Rab: Paying the Price

One of the most sustained and vigorous public debates today is about the value—and, crucially, the price—of college. But an unspoken, outdated assumption underlies all sides of this debate: if a young person works hard enough, they’ll be able to get a college degree and be on the path to a good life. That’s simply not true anymore, says Sara Goldrick-Rab, and with Paying the Price, she shows in damning detail exactly why.

Sara Goldrick-Rab is Professor of Higher Education Policy & Sociology at Temple University, and Founder of the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, the nation’s only translational research laboratory seeking ways to make college more affordable. She is the recipient of the William T. Grant Foundation’s Faculty Scholars Award and the American Educational Research Association’s Early Career Award, and in 2016 POLITICO magazine named her one of the top 50 people shaping American politics. Her latest book, Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream, is an Amazon best-seller, and has been featured on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, the New York Review of Books, and CSPAN’s Book TV, among other venues.

Visitor Parking
Parking in Rutgers–Camden lots is by permit only. Visitors to Rutgers–Camden should obtain a temporary permit to park in a lot from 8 a.m. Mondays through 5 p.m. Fridays. Contact Parking and Transportation for more information.

Parking and Transportation
(within the Rutgers University Police Department)
409 North Fourth Street
(856) 225-6137
Visit these sites for directions to campus and to view a campus map

“Rio’s True Olympic Legacy: What have we learned? What next?” Nov 15

“Rio’s True Olympic Legacy: What have we learned? What next?”
Theresa Williamson
Executive Director, Catalytic Communities, Rio de Janeiro
Tuesday, November 15, 2016
4:30-6pm
Multi-Purpose Room Campus Center

Sponsored by the Department of Public Policy and Administration, CURE, Urban Studies Program, and the Dean’s Office of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences

riopicDozens of official legacy promises were made to Rio de Janeiro’s citizens that would come as a result of hosting August’s Olympic Games. In the end, what Rio experienced was a very public six year “boom and bust” resulting in deep skepticism and anger over the failed legacies of the Games. Now, two months after the Games, Brazil is living through a deep economic recession, and in Rio crime rates and unemployment are rising while resources dry up, the police are downsizing, and the international media are swooping off to cover the next beat. The Olympics, which invested some $15 billion in the city, feel like a distant memory. And the past week’s mayoral election also brings an entirely new political agenda to the table.

With all these changes taking place as we speak, and taking Rio’s favelas–the city’s most chronically underserved communities–as the focal point, Williamson’s talk presents a deep introduction to Rio and its social struggles, including the city’s racial history, through the lens of Olympic legacy. What do Rio’s Olympic legacy promises tell us about Rio? About the Olympic Games? What were the true impacts of the Games and is there a silver lining? That is, were there impacts the city wouldn’t promote as legacies, that are, in practice, the true legacies? How have communities learned to act and resist thanks to the Games? And in this context, what will happen next to Rio de Janeiro? Is there hope?