Ida Wells-Barnett Annual Lecture: Reflections on 400 Years of African-Descended People in the New World

Ida B Wells Lecture flyer

Join us on Monday, February 4 for the Ida Wells-Barnett Annual Lecture.

Rutgers Alumnus, Prentiss A. Dantzler, PhD, is this year’s Ida B. Wells-Barnett speaker. Prentiss is an assistant professor of sociology and Mellon Faculty Fellow at Colorado College, and earned a doctorate in public affairs from Rutgers–Camden.

Date and Time
Monday, February 4 2019 at 6-8 PM
 
Location
Rutgers–Camden, Multi-Purpose Room

Next CURE Seminar: “A Neighborhood Politics of Last Resort: Post-Katrina New Orleans and the Right to the City”

The steep rise in neighborhood associations in post-Katrina New Orleans is commonly presented in starkly positive or negative terms – either romanticized narratives of community influence or dismissals of false consciousness and powerlessness to elite interests. 

In A Neighborhood Politics of Last Resort Stephen Danley offers a messier and ultimately more complete picture of these groups as simultaneously crucial but tenuous social actors. Through a comparative case study based on extensive fieldwork in post-Katrina New Orleans, Danley follows activists in their efforts to rebuild their communities, while also examining the dark underbelly of NIMBYism (“not in my backyard”), characterized by racism and classism. He elucidates how neighborhood activists were tremendously inspired in their defense of their communities, at times outwitting developers or other perceived threats to neighborhood life, but they could be equally creative in discriminating against potential neighbors and fighting to keep others out of their communities.

Considering the plight of grassroots activism in the context of national and global urban challenges, A Neighborhood Politics of Last Resort immerses the reader in the daily minutiae of post-Katrina life to reveal how multiple groups responded to the same crisis with inconsistent and often ad-hoc approaches, visions, and results.

View full event details

 

Speaker: 

Dr. Stephen Danley
Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Administration
Rutgers–Camden

Lunch will be served!

Date & Time
February 1, 2019 
12:15-1:30 p.m

 

Next CURE seminar: Dr. Michael Hayes, Friday, Dec. 7

This talk will present new findings on the unintended consequences of the New Jersey Superintendent Salary Cap (NJSSC). Starting in 2011, New Jersey set a salary cap for all future superintendent contracts based on student enrollment. This is one of the first state-imposed tax and expenditure limitations (TELs) placed directly on local public managers. The salary cap caused large reductions in base salaries for future superintendent contracts in the majority of NJ school districts. Using a difference-in-difference estimation strategy, the current study estimates the effect of NJSSC on superintendent turnover following the 2010-11 school year. Specifically, this study finds that an additional $10,000 reduction in base salary due to the NJSSC corresponds to a 4.0 percentage point increase in the likelihood of superintendent turnover for school districts with an expiring contract relative to those school districts without an expiring contract. Additionally, this study finds this increase in the likelihood of superintendent turnover following the enactment of NJSSC was largest for the least affluent school districts in New Jersey.

Michael Hayes

Dr. Michael S. Hayes received his PhD in Public Administration & Policy from the School of Public Affairs at American University. His research interests include public budgeting & finance, K-12 education finance, summer learning loss, value-added models, and state and local tax policy. He has been honored with the Emerging Scholars Award by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs & Administration. His research has been published in various academic journals including the American Journal of EducationEconomic LettersEducational PolicyJournal of Economic Geography, and Public Budgeting & Finance. He also has been interviewed and cited in numerous media outlets including The Brookings InstituteChalkbeatEducation WeekPolitico, U.S. News and World Report, The Wall Street JournalProfessor Hayes teaches Quantitative Methods, Foundations of Policy Analysis, and Financial Management of Public Programs.

 

Jargowsky and Hayes awarded $8,500 to study zoning’s contribution to school segregation in California

The Terner Center for Housing Innovation at UC Berkeley and the Center for California Real Estate (CCRE) have launched a new working paper series commissioning national experts to answer a range of relevant research and policy questions using a rich new data resource from a local land use and housing survey the Terner Center has been fielding in California over the past year. 

Jargowsky and Hayes’ proposed research entitled, Exclusionary Zoning Policies and School Segregation will employ the data from the Terner Residential Land Use Survey and the Stanford Education Data Archive to examine the contribution of zoning and other land use policies to school segregation in California, estimating models to address the following questions:

? How much of the variation in racial segregation within and between California school districts can be explained by restrictive land use policies?

? How much of the variation in income segregation within and between California school districts can be explained by restrictive land use policies?